The UX myths no one is talking about

Since the User Experience (UX) phenomenon became a trend for designers, there have been many misconceptions and wrong definitions of what UX really represents. Below, we have listed some of the most common misconceptions and myths about UX.

You know your readers and what they want
You DO NOT know what your readers really want! Each reader has different points of view and expectations on everything, especially when it comes to websites, designs, and products on the internet. If you really want to know more your readers, you need to conduct hundreds of surveys to discover what their background is, what they really want, to make analyses on the data you receive from your website, to discuss all these with behavioral psychologists, data analysts, etc. (Ok, a little bit exaggerated, but you really never get to know what your readers really want).

Only the designer is responsible for UX
Wrong! If a website owner wants to offer a great experience his readers while staying and scrolling at his page, the UX frame is part of the website’s strategy, purpose, and brand. This refutes the idea that if a website has to be UX, the designer is the person in charge for that. Of course, the designer will play a big role in the process, but so the brand manager, the PR manager and advice from experts.

Readers notice if a website offers them a User Experience
Not really! The User Experience stands in the smallest, invisible details which make the website look good, simple and attractive in general. A reader doesn’t just visits a website and says: “This website has UX design and that’s why I am liking it.” A website offers UX when the reader keeps scrolling, reading and discovering your website and at the end says: “This website looks good!”.

“I am the boss, I want the website to look like I say, and readers will love it”
Who said so? You may be the one who pays for the website, but you may not be an expert in branding, website themes, colors, programming and how really design works. Maybe you think you have a genial idea about launching a website that you believe will attract many readers. Do not confuse your website’s purpose with its design and layout. In most of the cases, they have a little to do with each other.

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